Response 4. Part 2 Papers

A. I disagree with Credo's assertion that consciousness is completely separate from the brain. He uses the example of 'zombies' as conceivable proof that mental experience is separate from the functions of the brain because these beings act just like normal humans except no brain function. While this example is conceivable and does highlight an interesting difference between body and mind, this does not completely disprove the relationship between body and mind but simply shows a hypothetical example of when there would be none. This hypothetical situation is logically imaginable, but so is a world without zombies, where brain function is equivocal to the mind. He then states that electrical stimulation in the brain often doesn't produce any experience in the brain, further proving his point. This is the complex cause fallacy because electrical stimulation is not the only form of brain stimulation that could be used in an attempt to activate mental experience, and he presents it in a way as though it is. The lack of mental activity in the brain could be effected by variables other than the electrical shock, which isn't really even proof to begin with because he says "many times" the electrical stimulation doesn't produce an experience. Many times implies that there was at least one time where the electrical stimulation did produce experience.
Brynne Alexander

          
B. I believe what the assertion is stating is that there is emotion and there is logic and they are not the same and they do not come from the same place. You may do something because that’s what you were taught to do but emotionally there is nothing there. We are taught to be sad at a funeral when somebody passes away and we can look sad and we can be sympathetic but we are not always sad. Not because we are cruel or morbid, but because maybe we did not know this person or had no emotional attachment to them. So you stand there and look sad and you may shed a tear only because the thought of death is sad but other than that there is nothing else going on.
Credo asserts, “Consciousness is not the same as brain function” which I happen to agree with one hundred percent. You can be going through the daily motions of life and not feel anything or think anything but you do it out of instinct. The most common psychiatric disease that we hear about is depression and how it affects many people in American. When a person is depressed they see nothing they hear nothing and they feel nothing. They go through the motions of their day and then they sleep and then they do it all again. They are physically there but not emotionally or spiritually. They have left their bodies and physical attachments. This is what the assertion means to me and I think its genius because its true, one doesn’t have to be there emotionally to be physically there.


C. I agree with Credo’s conclusion on consciousness being distinct from brain function. The human brain is a physical matter, an organ which resides in the human body. The mind is not a physical entity but an element. An element that produces thought, awareness, and creates a person’s intellect. If you open a person’s skull and observe their brain you cannot pin point where the mind is, but it’s there. The mind is an orb of energy that can’t be translated to a machine or in this case a zombie. This is because the mind creates thought which is a mental act, mental acts consist of free will. A machine cannot obtain free will because it is programed to follow a set of codes. However it can obtain a replica of a ‘brain’. This proves that mind and brain are different from one another.
Even though I agree with Credo’s conclusion his argument is weaken by the use of argumentum ad ignorantiam. Credos furthers his conclusion by stating: we know that mental experiences are not caused by electrical stimulation in the brain, since brain surgeons probe patient's brains with electrodes to evoke experiences all the time, and many times the electrical stimulation does not produce any experience in the person at all, hence the brain is not the same as the mind. It says that the all the times the surgeons performed this procedure to evoke an experience many of those trials did not evoke an experience. Just because many out of all the trials did not evoke the experience doesn’t mean some didn’t. In conclusion we cannot take that premise into account because it is not completely true and worthy of our belief.


D. Credo’s main conclusion in this was “Consciousness (what we experience mentally) is not the same as brain functions.” What this means is what we have knowledge is not because of our brain functions but something deeper like our soul. It took me a while to understand this until I read David Chalmers experiment sample of “zombies” (about several times) and in this he describes a world with zombies and no not literally are there zombies like in horror movies but real people except these people do not have a “soul” like they are just empty shells of humans who react like one and experience things but they don’t have a “soul” I found a good definition of what soul means “The essence of humanity (animal)” (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Soul (Links to an external site.))
“we know that mental experiences are not caused by electrical stimulation in the brain, since brain surgeons probe patient's brains with electrodes to evoke experiences all the time, and many times the electrical stimulation does not produce any experience in the person at all, hence the brain is not the same as the mind.” Here is a the reason that support’s the conclusion, this can be describe as the Mind//Body problem dualism where we have our brain which is a part of our body and of course helps us function but also we  have a “mind” which means a lot deeper it is like our spirt/soul “ability to think.” The ability to imagine, to create, to look beyond meanings, and etc,,, is what tell us we have a “mind” even if you are “plain” person you still imagine thing’s plainly you still give it thought and emotion I think that what Credo and Chalmers try to give to tell us that we have a mind because a “zombie” is someone or something that doesn’t have no mind is just a robot in a sense living it’s life and not experiencing things with emotions nor having a mind about it like I said an empty shell with no soul. 
 The Mind Body Dualism is what we really helped support this conclusion; mental mind: Ability to think, mind, spirit, and soul vs Body: occupies a unique position in space and head/brain. Now what I believe what hurt this conclusion is that there isn’t valid facts or scientific evidence behind your “spirit” for example when you die, when you die your brain shuts down and we can no longer you know speak to you, we don’t really know if we have a spirit/soul because there isn’t much evidence to prove this. Although I believe in spirits and there is lots of things about it doesn’t mean it’s true, we can’t just ask spirits that have left a body so this is what we can use to argue for it.
"Following the argument to its logical conclusion" okay so is the mind and brain the same thing? Is there such a thing of them being separate? Yes and No is my answer yes I might have just made a logical contradiction, and what that means for example is something being there and not there at the same time, another example meaning I could be sitting down at school but my “mind” can be elsewhere. Why I mean yes and no in this is because when Chalmers gave us that reason why are mind and brain are not the same thing “we know that mental experiences are not caused by electrical stimulation in the brain, since brain surgeons probe patient's brains with electrodes to evoke experiences all the time, and many times the electrical stimulation does not produce any experience in the person at all, hence the brain is not the same as the mind.” Is a good reason alone but what makes it a “No” is where when our brain shuts down our mind goes with it and we don’t have enough evidence behind the spirit world concept. The logical fallacy of the week that Credo committed was The Complex Cause.